Category Archives: Music

Kurt Cobain Outclasses Julian Schnabel

As a follow-up to a recent posting about “blood money,” dear Reader, I bring you some comments by two artists, one who wants profit regardless of the profit’s origin (the devil himself would presumably do), and another who didn’t mind telling certain kinds of potential purchasers of his art to kiss off.

The bit about Schnabel:

This single-minded, purist streak can come across as being rather privileged. Such as when he [Schnabel] scoffs at the idea of people protesting against the Sackler donations to major art institutes because of their connection to OxyContin. “I think to start to say that there is a cloud hanging over an institution because [people who donate money] have acquired it in some sort of nasty way … it’s hard.”

What about people who buy his work? Does he care where the money comes from? “When someone buys my work, I have no idea how they made their money or what they did. I’m happy to be able to sell a painting so I can make another painting.”

The bit about Cobain:

[I]n the liner notes of their album “Incesticide,” released that December, they warned: “If any of you in any way hate homosexuals, people of different color, or women, please do this one favor for us — leave us the f— alone! Don’t come to our shows and don’t buy our records.” The liner notes to their next album, “In Utero,” echoed that admonition: “If you’re a sexist, racist, homophobe or basically an a–hole, don’t buy this CD. I don’t care if you like me, I hate you.”

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Lacrimosa Indeed

A few years ago, I started an essay to unpack the Heideggerian baggage in the film The Tree of Life. If you haven’t seen it, you’re in luck, because the new, longer version is, according to Director Terrence Malick, a different film. The bonus will be that the Criterion Blu-Ray and DVD, which includes restored versions of both the original 139-minute and new 188-minute versions, will be released September 11. After the first version appeared, I gave a talk about it to a small crowd at a university in Colorado. They were, in large part, not amused. At that time, it wasn’t clear how many people, other than unrepentant Malick fans, would ever see The Tree of Life.

When I went back today to look for a clip to post here, I learned that my intended clip lists over 2.5 million views. Likely the musical accompaniment to the clip has more to do with the number of views than the cinematography. It makes me cry to think that I will need to see almost an extra hour of this film to complete my scholarly homework. Should you be in a weeping mode and not have time for 188 minutes of Lacrimosa, you might try dipping into Jan Kochanowski’s Laments.

Holiday Gift to Readers

How Many Canadians Does it Take to Play a Guitar?

This talented band might be coming to a city near you. Their North American and European tour is underway.

A Gift for the Holidays to the Readers of TFP

Base, Superstructure, Super Bass

When the hosts of Slate’s Culture Gabfest do not understand Nicki Minaj’s “Super Bass,” and think that it’s “fun” — though that statement came out in the same episode of their show in which they were reviewing a film about the destructive decadence of Wall Street’s employees –, one has to wonder whether others are doing a better job with understanding what is, and is not, happening. The Slate folks cannot see a fall from (Sophia) Grace when it is right before their eyes.  Sophia’s parents were crying (see related videos), though perhaps not because their daughter is badoom, boom, boom, doomed.  When Sophia met Nicki Minaj, Ms. Minaj thought the most appropriate thing to do was to take Sophia and her young friend on a “shopping spree.”  Capitalism is Super Base.

THE LAST CAPITALIST from jamie jones on Vimeo.

1Q84 Day in the U.S.

The epigraph for Murakami’s novel is:

It’s a Barnum and Bailey world,
just as phony as it can be,
But it wouldn’t be make-believe
if you believed in me

“It’s Only a Paper Moon,”
— Billy Rose and E.Y. “Yip” Harburg

With the popularity of this book, expect that Janáček’s Sinfonietta will receive more attention.