Tag Archives: Errol Morris

Capitalism Is A Limbo

The author DBC Pierre has been getting some extra mileage lately, thanks to a mention in Errol Morris’s The Ashtray. Morris cites Vernon God Little, but I’d like to point to a quotation in Lights Out in Wonderland (2010):

Capitalism is a limbo.

Not a structure but an anti-structure. Driven not towards a defined end, but hovering over a permanent present, harvesting a flow of helpless human impulses. It builds no safe futures, leaves no great structures, prepares no one for roads ahead. And why would it? We don’t march through an age of civilisation but float between Windows and Mac, treading water.

photo of DBC Pierre

DBC Pierre from article in Telegraph 02/09/2013

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“What the caterpillar calls the end, the rest of the world calls a butterfly”

Untitled, 30 November 2010, No. 1

Untitled, 30 November 2010, No. 1, created on an Ipad - ©David Hockney

Errol Morris and David Hockney are revising perception. This month, Morris publishes his book Believing is Seeing, a study of the ways viewers interact with photography and make truth-claims based on what they see in photographs.  Hockney is using a series of cameras to demonstrate to viewers that they can see more of the everyday world. He wants people to consider the question: “What can nine cameras do that one can’t?”  Someone could take both Morris and Hockney’s projects as nothing more than acts reinforcing relativism. That would seem to be an impoverished view of two people trying to think carefully about how we see, and how little we see when we insist that we are seeing.