Lilliputians of Higher Education Invent Microlectures

1900, The U.S. Printing Co., Russell-Morgan Print, Cincinnati & New York-No. 4370

1900, The U.S. Printing Co., Russell-Morgan Print, Cincinnati & New York-No. 4370

Worried about overworking yourself as an academic?  Are you an administrator trying to come up with the next flavor of the month for distance education?  We can all move to microlectures, as described in the Chronicle of Higher Education.  Apparently, one of this state’s flagship schools has no problems accepting transfer credits from a school in New Mexico that has developed microlectures.  The Dean at the school in New Mexico noticed, as some Deans tend to do as masters of tautology, that microlectures are short.  “It’s like snapshots of learning.”  If we adopt this model, classes could be 5-10 minutes long, demonstrating efficiencies that ought to cause the politicians seeking budgetary constrictions on higher education to lick this flavor. (For more on politicians, see paragraph six of one of Charlie Brooker’s columns.)  Microlectures could be especially impressive in a History Department, where, say, a professor could provide two or three microlectures to cover the rise and fall of Rome. It would be like snapshots of history.

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